'Miss you big homie': Michael B. Jordan praises Chadwick Boseman's historic SAG nominations

'Miss you big homie': Michael B. Jordan praises Chadwick Boseman's historic SAG nominations
Added 3 months ago
Summary: Michael B. Jordan offered a heartfelt tribute to Chadwick Boseman for making Screen Actors Guild Awards history.
Sentiment: positive
3 minute read
8 people have read this
Cryptos: $MTL

Michael B. Jordan has offered a heartfelt tribute to Chadwick Boseman for making Screen Actors Guild Awards history on Thursday.

Boseman, who died in August at the age of 43, received two posthumous SAG nominations for lead actor in his last onscreen performance in "Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom" and for supporting actor in Spike Lee's "Da 5 Bloods." The two films were also nominated for SAG's top prize – outstanding cast in a motion picture, its version of best picture, bringing Boseman's total to four, which set a record for most SAG nominations in one year.

Jordan praised his "Black Panther" costar's achievements on Instagram Friday by sharing four photos of Boseman from "Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom" and "Da 5 Bloods," where he played a young and hungry brass player and a squad leader who died in the Vietnam War, respectively.

"4. Still setting the bar higher. Miss you big homie," Jordan captioned the post.

Boseman also scored a Golden Globe nomination and two NAACP Image Awards nominations last week.

Boseman, a favorite for "Ma Rainey," is in the Golden Globe's drama actor race with Gary Oldman, Riz Ahmed ("Sound of Metal"), Anthony Hopkins ("The Father"), and Tahar Rahim ("The Mauritanian").  He's nominated as outstanding actor and supporting actor in the NAACP Image Awards for his work in "Ma Rainey" and "Da 5 Bloods"

In an interview with USA TODAY in December, Viola Davis, who plays the titular Ma Rainey, recalled what it was like working with Boseman and his dedication to a different instrument in his day-to-day life after the cameras stopped rolling.

"One of the things that he carried everywhere was his djembe drum, which is called a talking drum in Africa. And he carried it himself," Davis said. "He said ‘Viola, wherever I go, I carry my djembe drum. … I do it for me. I play this drum for me, for my healing. 

"It felt like he was playing that for God, for himself. There's no words to describe the playing, because I love the djembe drum, but listening to him play when he had breaks in that trailer was just phenomenal."

Contributing: Anika Reed

Viola Davis talks ‘healing’ music:Chadwick Boseman played making 'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom'